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and said use your good office with the president jackson. tell him he should pardon arthur, you know, his mother is very good. as she said, you know, the execution would be worse that night crime. and that she couldn't contemplate that arthur would be executed. he objects and unmoved and so the clock keeps ticking. >>> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >>> at age 25 one of the waitest widow and during the revolution,
much. [applause] >> the best day to be a planet in america was july 9, 2004, when dick jackson and lawrence frank came out with a book called urban sprawl and public health. and what the book finally did, some technical epidemiological meet on the social logic of those that we've been arguing about and said no uncertain terms, the suburbs are killing us and here's why. and cities can save us and here's why. by far the greatest aspect of the epidemic, i should say of our health challenges in america is the obesity epidemic. it's not that obesity itself is a problem but all these illnesses that obesity leads to. principal among them diabetes. diabetes now consumes 2% of our gdp. a child born after 2000 has a one in three chance in america becoming a diabetic. when i look at the first generation of americans who are going to live shorter lives than their parents. is probably not a huge surprise to you. we've all been talking about longtime about the wonders of the american corn syrup diet, and only reason as the argument have the studies been done comparing diet and physical inact
with them. they delighted in him them all their lives. it was wonderful. andrew jackson, for example, rear of the sun. andrew jackson junior was one of a set of twins. they day one of the twins to the jackson's two race. it was an odd back then, but it would be today. they all stayed in close touch. >> [inaudible question] >> i would love to tell you that, but unfortunately they did not let me choose. [laughter] the publisher chose the objects in the picture. they were basically looking for 18th century iconic objects. at one point he had mount vernon in the background, which i thought was a very keen idea. except it was the present-day mount vernon which did not exist at that time. i sent back a picture of what mount vernon look like, they sent it back and said it was not grand enough. [laughter] >> are there any other questions? is not, thank you so much. i have loved talking with you. [applause] back. >> at age 25, she was one of the wealthiest in the colonies. the british threatened to take her hostage and later she would become the nation's first lady. meet martha washington and he st
personal physician. he was a personal physician to angela davis. he also sought george jackson commissaries never joined the party. this is at a time in oakland and listen in turn and oakland highland hospital. he helped the party to strategize about sickle cell anemia program organized and the southwest he helped the party around chapters, educating the rank-and-file members. >> host: why are you writing about this now? is the health care debate we just had in this country? >> guest: i jot those connections in the boat. part of what's interesting is 45 years after the black panther party was founded, we still have fundamental issues talking about the issues that have come back and public discourse with regard to the affordable care act. we should pay for her, should everyone have a baseline level of help cared this are precisely the issues to 45 years ago panthers were talking about. they seem far more radical. obviously still right now, but it's interesting that the third circuit shifted into mainstream discourse in a particular sort of way. i think also i'm writing about this now because
.com/booktv. >> the best day to be a player in america was july 9, 2004, when dick jackson, holly from dan, and lawrence frank came out with a book about public health. what i did was put some epidemiological meet on the sociological bones that we planners have been arguing about. the suburbs are killing us, here is why. the greatest aspect of that epidemic, or our health challenges is the obesity epidemic. it's not the obesity itself is the problem, but all of this illness is that it leads to. diabetes consumes 2% of our gross national product. a child born after the year 2051 in three chance of becoming a diabetic. we are now looking at the first generation of americans who are going to live shorter lives than their parents. that is probably not a huge surprise to you. we have all been talking about the wonders of the american diet and the sodas that we are drinking. only recently has the argument and have the studies been done comparing diet and physical inactivity. one doctor at the mayo clinic for patients and electronic underwear and measured every motion. set a certain diet regime and some people
to be a planner in america was july 9, 2004, when dick jackson, howie frumpkin and lawrence frank came out with a book called "urban sprawl and public health." and what that book finally did was put some technical epidemiological meat on the sociological bones that we plan ors have been arguing about and said in no uncertain terms the suburbs are killing us, and here's why, and cities are safe us, and here's why. by far the greatest aspect of the epidemic is the obesity epidemic. all the illnesses that obesity leads to. principle among them diabetes. diabetes now consumes 2% of our gross national product. a child born after 2000 has a one in three chance in america of becoming a diabetic. we are now looking at the first generation of americans who are going to live shorter lives than their parents. that's probably not a huge surprise to you. we've all been talking now for a long time about the wonders of the american corn syrup-based diet and the 40 ounce and 08 ounce sodas people are drinking, but only recently have the studies been done comparing diet and physical inactivity. one of them
of heavy jackson that was there. >> guest: yes, and i listened to lots of recordings of that speech. i had never quite heard that. maybe she allowed stage whispering and i want to believe that story. >> host: she loved him. the reason i'm at dr. king was because i was staying at her home in chicago as a young girl and dr. king would come by there and as a matter of fact i met him the day after he was hit in the head at guage part. remember the story click to talk about the story about him getting hit in the head in illinois. did you meet dr. king. >> guest: i only saw him from a distance. >> host: how close were you? >> guest: i tried to get as close as i could about a foot from the lincoln memorial but the notion as a 19-year-old that i would actually shake hands with him, that would have been the thrill of my life. i only saw him speak twice and both times i saw him as a member of the crowd. he came to ucla when i was student there and spoke so that was the other time. this was maybe 1965 something like that. >> host: how did that impact you? you have this long jersey on -- journey on th
turned this into what jesse jackson turned it as among white man tracks down black man and shoots him in back of head. he was shot in the chest. severely injured in that fight, having his head pounded against the pavement. the way the media played it is that george zimmerman had not been injured, stocking and for fun and decided to shoot a black guy for a reason in the cut the 911 tapes. they took the tape in which he was specifically asked what is the race of the person you're following. he says he's black. nbc cut the tape. the cut of the entire exchange. he had to be prompted for the race. the reason that mattered was that they used this incident as an excuse to push liberal policy. they send al sharpton down and talk about how the sanford police to margaret is massively racist which is just a symptom of the believable race provision in america. has it does all the time. president obama and many others put it cy. this is just one black guy. it happens all the time. that's the kind of country we live in. this argument rose all the way to the level of the presidency with the presiden
in the first place. the media turned this into what jesse jackson term debt as, white man, black man shoots him, it wasn't shot in the back of the head but in the chest, george zimmerman was severely injured in that fight, having his head pound against the pavement, there were pictures of it. away the media played is george zimmerman had ever been injured, george zimmerman was stalking him for fun and decided to issue a black guy for no reason and they cut the 911 take to make it look like that. he is being sued because of that. they took the 911 take in which george zimmerman was this request with the raise of the person you're following, he said he is black. nbc cut that tape so what it sounds like george zimmerman is saying is he looks suspicious, he is black. they cut out the extent entire exchange with the dispatcher. he had to be prompted for the raise. the reason that matters is the these the fresh point incidents as an excuse to the liberal policy. here's our work, send al sharpton down to talk about how the stanford police department is massively racist and that in general is a symptom
. and 11 members of the rna are arrested and they're paraded through jackson half naked. and one of the neighbors calls back to detroit and since this is happening. and one of the members of the rna, so the lawyer then called conyers office to tell them what's happening and to try to get conyers office to intercede and basically try to protect so these people don't get killed. because there's been a shootout, and officer or to have been shot. and its rosa parks it's important basically calls and calls and calls the department of justice until she gets assurance in that kind of like weird way where it's like no, thethey're not being her but noy will get hurt. and she, at a very much a tribute her kind of quickness and her kind of getting on the phone to the department of justice of saving their lives. and the lawyer is heading the rna at the point says that he would then call passionate he's in prison for the next five years on conspiracy charges, and she just repeatedly called and she says hello, this is rosa parks calling and just to show them that she was watching. so to me it
jackson half and one of the neighbors call us back to detroit and says this is happening. one of the members, so then cause conyers on faith and to get contraceptives to intercede and try to protect for these people don't just get killed because there's been a shootout of an officer. two had been shot and it's rosa parks who basically did on the phone calls until she gets an assurance in that weird way recite their not being hurt, but nobody will get hurt. they very much attribute her quickness to saving their lives and a mario bertinelli says she would then call. he's in prison for the next five years on conspiracy charges and she repeatedly calls and says hello this is rosa calling. just to show them she was watching. so to me that speaks to both her firmness and disability unsure and ability to kind of do things. so ed von ran a bookstore and each rate and he talked about her. they would go to the bookstore of the time. there is all these discussion groups and activists groups that came out of the bookstore and she would attend many of their forearms. he was saying to me, h
are arrested to and paraded through jackson half naked. one of the neighbors called back to detroit and said this is happening and one member of the rna called conyers's office to tell them what is set in and get conyers's office to intercede and protect some people don't get killed because there has been issued out, an officer had been shot. rosa parks gets on loan, the department of justice, she gets an assurance in that weird way, nobody will get hurt and they very much attribute her kind of quickness and getting on the phone to the department of justice saving their lives. the head of the rna says she would then call, in prison for the next five years on conspiracy charges and she repeatedly calls and says this is rosa parks calling and just to show them that she was walking, to me that speaks of her firmness and disability to view things, she attended -- edward bond wrote a book store in detroit and talks about her like she -- would go into the bookstore all-time and there were all these discussion groups and activist groups that came out of the bookstore and she would attend many of th
. the media promptly turned this into what jesse jackson termed it as, white man tracks down black man, shoots him in the back of the head. george zimmerman was having his head pounded against the pavement. the way the media played it is that george zimmerman had never been injured, he was stalking him for fun and decided to shoot a black guy, and they cut the 911 tapes. now nbc's being sued because of that. they took the 911 tape in which george zimmerman was specifically asked what is the race of the person that you're following, they said he's black. nbc cut that tape so it sounds like what george zimmerman is saying is it sounds like he's suspicious, he's black. they used this flashpoint incident as an excuse to push liberal policy. here's how it works. they send al sharpton down there to talk about how the sanford police department is massively racist, and that, in general, is just a symptom of the unbelievable racism that pervades america. it's still a huge problem in america. racism happens all the time. as president obama and many others put it, they're really -- al sharpton did this a
has kind of erupted into the discussion about janet jackson and the super bowl and rap music and the "sopranos" and violence and the f.c.c. crack down on obscenity. it feels to me a little bit like right now the state of the debate ises -- there's two sides. one side thinks the pop culture is so bad that the federal government needs to intervene to clean things up. the other side just thinks that it's really, really bad. you know, that's the powlart we have. what i'm trying to do in this book is to say, yes, there may be legitimate questions to ask about the role of violence in popular media and some of us may feel there's too much sex or too much obscenity. but that's not the whole story. and in fact, if you look at pop culture from another angle, the angle that i try and describe in the book, if you look at it in terms of the kind of mental work you have to do to make sense of a television show or video game ordeal with interactive media, the kind of problem solving you have to do, the amount of focus and patience and intellectal exercise you have to work through that on av
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)

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